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Summary

BBC Audio presents Sense and Sensibility, Jane Austen's acclaimed comedy of manners. Containing a truly memorable cast of characters, including the snobbish Mrs Ferrers, selfish John Dashwood and his awful, grasping wife.

Sisters Marianne and Elinor approach romance differently. Marianne impulsively jumps into love with the charming John Willoughby, subjecting her to ridicule and gossip. Elinor, fearful of social ridicule, appears prudent. Can each sister find happiness in a society driven by status? 

Narrated by Annette Crosby.

©1996, 1999, 2006 BBC Studios Distribution Ltd (P)1996, 1999, 2006 BBC Studios Distribution Ltd

What listeners say about Sense and Sensibility

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  • Overall
    2 out of 5 stars

Misleading description!

Not everything labelled 'BBC' is a guarantee of quality it seems. I'm afraid I was taken in by the word 'dramatised' - it is anything BUT! Miss Austen's delightful characters are reduced to colourless images, hardly distinguishable one from the other, in Annette Crosbie's lacklustre narration. After 4 attempts I noted I had dozed off at exactly the same point each time! Soporific, but hardly what I look for in a good read, or rather, listen!

3 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars

too much missing

too much missing from the book ( this is all I want to say, but you won't let me stop at the 1st sentence!)

1 person found this helpful

  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars

Sense and sensibility (not dramatised)

This is not dramatised but one of the excellent abridgments caried out under the BBC for 'Womans Hour' daily radio program.
Well read and sensibly shortened. I enjoyed it.

1 person found this helpful

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  • Overall
    2 out of 5 stars
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  • Martha
  • 23-02-10

Not a Dramatization

Although, this is a good reading, it is, in no way a dramatization of this book. I was very disappointed after downloading it to find that I had obtained yet another reading version of the novel. I would not recommend anyone buy it thinking they are getting a dramatization.

2 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
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  • Joseph R
  • 13-08-09

A Satisfying Dramatisation

Annette Crosbie did a fine job with this dramatised book but I am listening to the unabridged version of S&S as I write. I am at the part after Lucy's secret is revealed. One thing which has always puzzled me: when first introduced, Miss Lucy Steele's sister was Ann but there seems to be a name change to Nancy when Fanny Dashwood was told of the engagement. Did I misunderstand and perhaps Nancy is a maid? Only four people were in on Lucy's secret: Lucy, sister Ann, Edward and finally Elinor. Lucy's sister is the one who opened big mouth and inserted both feet up to her elbows letting loose Lucy's secret so why would some Nancy have angered anyone? Did Austen decide on a name change or was there some editorial blunder or more likely, I am just boneheaded don't understand something obvious?

Like all Austen books, S&S is a book about books. Miss Austen was a promiscuous reader. I have been reading some of the books which are referenced by her. The woman was a soap oera addict. In the 17 and 1800's, soaps were books by Samuel Richardson, Ann Radcliffe, Fanny Burney, et al. The stuff would sell Tide and Cheer by the case.

Finally, have you noticed how much pain is inflicted by good natured folks such as Mrs. Jenkins, Sir Middleton or Mrs. Palmer with their well intentioned jokes? Their friendly ill-considered raillery cause more pain than the intentional slights and put-downs by actual enemies. The fortune teller in Rude Awakenings of a Jane Austen Addict said that one could not have a better advisor than Jane Austen novels. There are folks about who could do with some Austen advice.

1 person found this helpful