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Summary

Tenement Kid is Bobby Gillespie's story up to the recording and release of the album that has been credited with 'starting the 90's', Screamadelica.

Born into a working-class Glaswegian family in the summer of 1961, Bobby's memoirs begin in the district of Springburn, soon to be evacuated in Edward Heath's brutal slum clearances. Leaving school at 16 and going to work as a printers' apprentice, Bobby's rock 'n' roll epiphany arrives like a bolt of lightning shining from Phil Lynott's mirrored pickguard at his first gig at the Apollo in Glasgow. Filled with 'the holy spirit of rock n roll' his destiny is sealed with the arrival of the Sex Pistols and punk rock, which to Bobby represents an iconoclastic vision of class rebellion and would ultimately lead to him becoming an artist initially in the Jesus and Mary Chain then in Primal Scream.

Structured in four parts, Tenement Kid builds like a breakbeat crescendo to the final quarter of the book, the Summer of Love, Boy's Own parties and the fateful meeting with Andrew Weatherall in an East Sussex field. As the '80s bleed into the '90s and a new kind of electronic soul music starts to pulse through the nation's consciousness, Primal Scream become the most innovative British band of the new decade, representing a new psychedelic vanguard taking shape at Creation Records.

Ending with the release of Screamadelica and the tour that followed in the autumn, Tenement Kid is an audiobook filled with the joy and wonder of a rock 'n' roll apostle who would radically reshape the future sounds of fin de siècle British pop. Published 30 years after the release of their masterpiece, Bobby Gillespie's memoir cuts a righteous path through a decade lost to Thatcherism and saved by acid house.

PLEASE NOTE: When you purchase this title, the accompanying PDF will be available in your Audible Library along with the audio. 

©2021 Bobby Gillespie (P)2021 Orion Publishing Group

What listeners say about Tenement Kid

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Glad he doesn't sing like he narrates

Didn't get past chapter one without feeling suicidal at the narration and the story line.

Not for me thanks, rather than chuck myself in the Clyde, I'm away tae get ma rocks aff!

Stick to singing and performing, the Rev IM Jolly has got nothing on you.

2 people found this helpful

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Awful narration

The narration is just awful. What a long drawn out boring, boring, boring voice.
I can understand that he has to slow down his Glasgow accent so folk from elsewhere can understand him (I have the same accent) but OH MY GOD! This guy could put drying paint to sleep!

1 person found this helpful

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Narration challenging

Bobby's narration is hard work. Not sure I'll make it to the end. It's a decent biog but I would recommend reading it rather than listening.

1 person found this helpful

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Entertaining and enjoyable

Sometimes self indulgent but a really entertaining listen, loved hearing about Bobby's younger days

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"Dead man's fall"

Loved the fact that Bobby had such a similar childhood as me! Best man falls which we called Dead man's fall was one of my favourite games coz my imagination would run riot haha! Climbing, Falling, Fighting was just the norm and the Best Days 😛
Thanx Bobby for such a great book and also a great walk doon memory lane, You are the Real Rock n Rolla xxx

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Brilliant

Not a typical biopic, Uncle Bob takes us on a journey of social acceptance of equality, well worth your time.

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Screamadelica

Bobby Gillespie writes like Steinbeck, but for 90"s contempories. Where has rock & roll gone?

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Authenticity

This is him laid bare. It’s who he is and he’s telling you the making of him. Don’t judge… enjoy… listen … get it

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Billiant life events & wonderfully told!

I really loved this. I was toying with getting it for a few months but so pleased I eventually got it. A very interesting story for anyone who loves music generally and an accurate depiction of life growing up early 70s, 80s and onwards. Really interesting, no nonsense, honest, factful and wonderfully told. 5star

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Loved Bobby’s narration

Brilliant, rather than a tale of “we were massive, we played to 100k people, did this/that, then released another platinum album, did more massive shows” the book is about his childhood growing up in working class Glasgow, his socialist parents and the journey to releasing his big breakthrough with Screamadelica. Amazing story.